Paseo Cayalá, Guatemala City, Guatemala

Paseo Cayalá is a dream made a city.

I want to confess something: I don’t like to search for pictures of the places I’m goint to travel to. It feels like ruining the surprise for me. I like to fall in love at first sight with the places. That’s what happened with Paseo Cayalá.

The only things I knew about it was the things I heard, like it was beautiful and you feel like walking in Europe and, of course, it was expensive to live in (yes, you can live in Paseo Cayalá, because it also has residences behind the mall and those houses were to die for!).

But heard about it and observe it by myself are two different sensations. And, sometimes, I like it better when I know nothing about that place and blind-fall in love with it. It gives me the space to imagine stories that happened there and to admire it unconditionally.

So, when we got to Paseo Cayalá, the first thing I asked myself was: What is this place? It looked so green and buildings so white. The only flowers adding some color to the view were hydrangeas, anything else had a pattern of white, brown and green.

The streets were rustic, or that made you feel, full of flat stones so your feet won’t hurt when walking. There were a lot of buildings, white buildings, with a lot of stores in them. The windows were tall and big. Every building, even though we already knew it was a mall, appeared like a house.

There were only like 2 buildings in the mall area that weren’t like the others. One with some stairs and columns in it and the other that was a catholic church. We went to the church first, we wanted to get a mass there but, we had back luck that day and found it closed.

We decided to go to the Farmers Market in the middle of Paseo Cayalá and bought some coconut water.

Then, we went back to the other building that was different and noticed it had some amazing details like corncobs at the top of every column. I figured it had to do something with culture.

We went up the stairs and saw from there, there was a huge garden where there was a lot of movement, white chairs and white tables and a lot of people running all over the place, I figured it had to do with a wedding.

We left for our last stop the Cayalá Giant, which is a marble sculpture of a giant laid on the ground.

The place was so gorgeous and so thematic I thought it has to have some history! In the way back home, I was thinking if that was an historic place who then, someone, transformed in this gorgeous city. They might used the structures and renew some things to give it a decadent look but as chic as this era. I imagined a lot of things, so many things that when I got back to my house, I needed to find out some more about Paseo Cayalá’s history.

And here is the only disappointment I got from this place: Paseo Cayalá has no history behind it, it was build to be this way. There was no family in there before, there is no old structures used to make it look this way, there was no history. It was a bummer for sure, such an interesting place with no history looks like a disappointment.

But then I thought that was even better! See, this place was an empty space before, and it took 10 years to create it just with the purpose of creation and movement, they gave it this feeling of old city made new, just because they wanted to. They created something from nothing. There was no history there, it is written today!

As a writer I tend to forget that not every piece has to have a history, sometimes I just could describe what’s in there without telling a story and that’s a piece of work and that’s ok.

As a creator, I tend to forget that I have the permission to create something just for the sake of create it, just for the sake of it to be beautiful.

As a person, I tend to forget I don’t need to have a story to tell but I’m writing history with my actions every day!

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