The right platform: Where should I write my book?

I created my first successful product in just 10 days. I realized the creation process is as valuable as the product itself and I want to share it. Welcome to the Making-of The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes.

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide! (All the chapters are here).

The right platform: Where should I write my book?

My thoughts about the right tools is pretty clear. But the actual writing needs its own chapter, and not because I’m suggesting some kind of tool but because I work in modules. It’s just the way I’m wired.

I don’t have a right platform. I have three and even though all of them are for writing, each one has a specific function.

My first platform is a sketchbook. You might already know this since in the blank page and in the writing plan is shown.

I write the ideas, modules, projects, index, the plan, everything that’s strikeoutable goes here.

Questions, notes, the parts of the book, the structure and even those little loose ideas that I’m still deciding if incorporate or not to the book.

I could say that everything that’s about the conception of the book goes in a sketchbook.

All that creative brainstorm where I’m translating the book from my brain to an actual written plan to follow needs to be in a sketchbook.

Also the first two paragraphs or more if I feel like it.

My second platform is Google Docs. I know! The most simple editor available is where I write my book. There’s a reason to it: It does the job. Well, two reasons: It doesn’t have distractions.

I can just open a doc, write the two paragraphs I wrote in my sketchbook and just keep writing until my fingers hurt.

I like writing all the book content in Google Docs. I apply just basic formats when needed, like bold or italic or titles to distinguish sections.

My third platform is Microsoft Word. Having the content written, I just need to make it prettier. I like to struggle with design and templates at the end because it’s a time I take to also editing the content at the same time.

Hey, tomorrow is my birthday! I’m turning 26. 🙂 As a celebration, you can get The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes with a 26% discount! https://gum.co/MWsPD/happybirthday

This sale ends on April 12th, 2016 at 23:59 so get The Mini-Guide with an amazing discount now! https://gum.co/MWsPD/happybirthday 😀

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide where I share everything I know about writing books! (If you want to read all the past chapters go here).

The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes was created under the Small Product Lab July 2015 hosted by Gumroad. I’m forever grateful with Gumroad and Small Product Lab for those 10 days.

If you want to read the next chapter of the Making-of The Mini-Guide when is ready, join here:http://kath.pw

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The Right Tools: What do I need to write a book?

I created my first successful product in just 10 days. I realized the creation process is as valuable as the product itself and I want to share it. Welcome to the Making-of The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes.

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide! (All the chapters are here).

The Right Tools: What do I need to write a book?

To write a book you need pencil and paper. Maybe an eraser. That’s all you need. So if you have that or more, you can write a book.

I think, sometimes, we’re expected to have the best quality in our tools, since it’s our profession, since we’re using them everyday. But, I beg to differ this time, the approach I have with tools is the same I have with audience.

Work with what you have. If it’s not the best tool, but you have the tool, make the most out of it.

You shouldn’t wait to have the best tool to start working.

I must confess there were countless days where I really though my blog would be updated more often if I had a MacBook. Or that my selfies would be greater if I had a Canon. Or that my books would be sold more often if I know more about photoshop or any design program (more about this in the next chapter, I promise).

But guess what? I’ve never had a MacBook and I’m actually updating less. In fact, I had no computer for a month and I had to write from my phone, and that didn’t stop me. And it’s good.

My selfies are not greater with a Canon. I got one. A digital one. But I still took my selfies with my frontal VGA camera. And they’re not greater. And it’s good.

My books were not more sold because of their design (I know, I’m still shocked about this one). And they’re selling. And it’s good.

It is what it is. If you have something now, work with that now. If you don’t have a computer and have a typewriter, well, use that typewriter. From pencil and paper up are the right tools to write a book.

Never think that because you don’t have the tools the cool kids have, your work has less value.

Here’s the thing. When you buy a book, you’re not buying the tool it was made with. You buy the words and what those make you feel.

I had doubts about my tools at first, but then I remembered that my audience wanted to read my knowledge and wanted me to help them to save time writing. They couldn’t care less about the tools I used to write this book.

I have the same feeling about my university tools, I don’t know why sometimes I feel like if I had more recent tools or more expensive tools, my grades would be better. But when I realize what I really use in the hard work, you’ll notice none of that matters. I just need a marker to my books, a pen to draw or calculate stuff, a pencil to make tests. And that’s basically how I get a grade. No need of fancy stuff.

If a tool does the work, then so be it.

You’re not the stuff you use, your work is made of brains. Tools ONLY make it easier, but not get it done. Brains get it done.

I know you may have better tools than mine, or may have worse but done a better job. That’s because our minds work differently because of what we’ve lived, and not because of the tools. Remember, tools are made with one purpose and that purpose is for every tool. Pencils draw lines and that’s their purpose. But you may draw a square and I may draw a circle. The pencil did their work, but it was our brain doing the magic.

The tools that made it easier to create this book were: a 15″ HP laptop, a sketchbook, a Kindle Keyboard, an HP printer, a box of pens and pencils and a Canon camera.

But what created the book was my experience of living at Mexico for several years on my own, the system I created for me to write quickly while living abroad and the time my fingers needed to translate the idea in my mind to a readable text in Google Docs.

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide where I share everything I know about writing books! (If you want to read all the past chapters go here).

The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes was created under the Small Product Lab July 2015 hosted by Gumroad. I’m forever grateful with Gumroad and Small Product Lab for those 10 days.

If you want to read the next chapter of the Making-of The Mini-Guide when is ready, join here:http://kath.pw

The Writing Plan: What’s the best kept secret about writing a book?

I created my first successful product in just 10 days. I realized the creation process is as valuable as the product itself and I want to share it. Welcome to the Making-of The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes.

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide! (All the chapters are here).

The Writing Plan: What’s the best kept secret about writing a book?

The best kept secret about writing books is that books are not written by inspiration but organization. Inspiration gives ideas but organization brings the book to life. I’m sorry, there’s no trick* or magic, it’s just organization and hard work.

I want to share my Writing Plan.

I like to work with everything I have, this is why my Writing Plan it seems basic, but I swear there’s no tricks behind a book. It’s just me, my computer and all the tools I have in a certain order.

The big areas of my Writing Plan are:

  • Write the book (green).
  • Write the landing page (purple).
  • Publish it in my galleries (pink).
  • Write bonuses for early buyers (aqua).
  • Publish it in the 3 places with higher conversion rates for presale (orange).
  • Publish it in every social media channel I’m a part of for presale (blue).

Once I decided what my big areas are, I like to divide those big areas into simple tasks. It’s just easier for me to read “create the perfect title” than “write the book” for example.

One thing I like to be clear about is I like to start the presale stage when I have the content ready. I just like to be sure that, when the launch date comes, I have at the very least the content already written.

Many other people like to start the presale when they have the idea, and that’s ok. It’s just a matter of organization in their own writing plan. They just decided to write and publish the landing page first and then write the book.

Also, I know I might be a little bit conservative here but I like to make things with the tools I already have. For example, I don’t like doing ads but because I feel it’s more organic to share what I’m creating with the people who already show interest. Sometimes, I like to be more about what I have now instead of dreaming of the possibilities.

Maybe I could reach a bigger audience with ads or maybe I could annoy them by making ads and interrupt them while they’re reading something they’re interested in. That’s a doubt that I don’t have the time to answer when my focus is to write a book.

That’s why I decided to publish in every social media channel I have, because if someone took the time to click that follow button is because they truly want to know something about me. I feel better talking to real people who have shown real interest.

If running ads fits you, do it, add it to your writing plan and forget about what I said.

*I know I said there’s no trick but I like to reward myself and that might be a trick I’m using to accomplish every task in the Writing Plan. I love desserts like crazy and everytime I finish a big area, I reward myself with a dessert! Maybe it’s not the trick you were waiting for but rewarding myself with a treat has helped me feel like a winner who’s making steady progress.

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide where I share everything I know about writing books! (If you want to read all the past chapters go here).

The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes was created under the Small Product Lab July 2015 hosted by Gumroad. I’m forever grateful with Gumroad and Small Product Lab for those 10 days.

If you want to read the next chapter of the Making-of The Mini-Guide when is ready, join here: http://kath.pw

The Perfect Name: How to best name my product?

I created my first successful product in just 10 days. I realized the creation process is as valuable as the product itself and I want to share it. Welcome to the Making-of The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes. ❤

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide! (All the chapters are here).

The Perfect Name: How to best name my product?

I had to share my product with the world even though I didn’t even started to creating it. It was a difficult task because naming things, whether it’s products or posts or emails is complicated. Or at least I feel it complicated.

I ended up just describing it because I thought that maybe I could find a better name later. I figured the naming and sharing shouldn’t become an obstacle, if I took too much time on this, it would start feeding my anxiety, so I just called it – while I found a better name – a checklist to write a super complete post in 20 minutes for busy bloggers only.

And I posted it like that the first time. And it worked because it called someone’s attention. Which was a good thing, but let’s face it, it wasn’t a strong name.

This person told me: “I’m not a busy blogger but I’d love to save some time so I can focus on creating”.

That’s when I knew I couldn’t call the busy bloggers’ attention because they’re busy, they don’t have time for cross out a checklist, but the people who is looking to save time creating could find my checklist useful! And what’s even more amazing, people who is looking to save time creating will happily invest 30 minutes or less in reading a guide.

That checklist evolve into a mini-guide and then, the name and the motto finally made an appearence in my life.

I’d create The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes and I’d help creators save time writing to spend it on the things they really want.

Thinking backwards, what really happened was this: I presented the idea of my product and then used the words the right audience used to describe it.

Do not confuse this with a poll, I didn’t ask them to help me find names, I didn’t ask them what sounds better nor what they feel about it nor if they feel like buying it.

I just presented the idea of my future product and they commented about that idea.

If you’re stuck with the name of your product, just write what is it, what does it do and who does it help. Present it to some people and read carefully their comments, you might have described it accurately but they’re the ones who are using the right words that’ll resonate with more people.

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide where I share everything I know about writing books! (If you want to read all the past chapters go here).

The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes was created under the Small Product Lab July 2015 hosted by Gumroad. I’m forever grateful with Gumroad and Small Product Lab for those 10 days.

If you want to read the next chapter of the Making-of The Mini-Guide when is ready, join here: http://kath.pw

The Blank Page: What’s the first thing to write when creating something.

I created my first successful product in just 10 days. I realized the creation process is as valuable as the product itself and I want to share it. Welcome to the Making-of The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes.

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide! (All the chapters are here).

The Blank Page: What’s the first thing to write when creating something.

Let’s start from the very beginning. The Blank Page syndrome. This syndrome happens when you just can’t start writing in the first page of your project. Whether it’s a book or you simply can’t take action on your new project, we have been here. I know I’ve been.

In my past projects, when I finally had everything set up to start writing and had the white page in front of me, a lot of questions came to my mind. Not existential questions but the type of questions you have no idea where to begin. Like what should I type first? Should I write the index, the introduction, the first chapter or my favorite chapter? Is it okay if I write the conclusion first, so I know where this book is heading? Or maybe I should research more because only when I read one more book I’ll be sure what to write in the first page?

The real problem with the blank page is not a blank mind, is actually a mind full of ideas and not knowing what to write first!

The real solution here is not “just sit and write” or “lowering the quality bar”. Because when you finish writing the first chapter, you’ll have the same problem with the second chapter. You want to write the most complete book, the encyclopedia of your topic. And you have to market it, too. There’s too much to do that you simply cannot finish anything.

What’s the catch, then?

The first thing to write when creating something has nothing to do with that something. You have to step back of that something and appreciate the full picture first. At least, that’s what I did this time.

Whenever I tried to write a new book in the past, I could write a few chapters and then leave it for good. Because I had the same questions at every chapter.

But this time, I wrote something else before jumping into writing the actual book. And even though this something was harder to write, it made the consequent process easier.

If you’re having troubles to start writing a book or just starting a project, the problem is not a blank mind, the problem is not a blank page, the actual problem is that you want to write a book for the sake of writing a book and not because is something meaningful to your life.

When something is meaningful, you prepare yourself, you don’t just do it.

What better example than cooking?

If you’re hungry, you might prepare an instant soup, you just take the cup and prepare it and it’s done.

But if you’re cooking for a special occasion, you prepare yourself, you know what to do, when to do it, where to buy the ingredients, what plate you’ll prepare, dessert and beverage, you plan everything and you know that this meal means something in your life and you’re doing it because you want a certain type of result. You’re not cooking for the sake of cooking or just because you’re hungry, you want this to be special.

So, what do you do to make this project special? Do you need to research more? Do you need to find the right tools? Or the index of the book? Actually, none of that, yet.

You need to write why you’re doing this and your goals. What do you expect to accomplish with this new project? What this project means to you?

The first page is not about the book, it’s about the purpose of this book in your life and your readers’ life.

This might be harder to write than deciding what the first chapter should be, but investing several time on this will help you to save a lot of more time producing the book.

There’s two misleading factors about writing the reasons and the goals in the first page.

  1. Thinking it’s a waste of time.
  2. Thinking it’s an easy task.

If I can say something for certain, writing the reasons and the goals is not a waste of time. When you’re honest with yourself and speak up the real reason why you want to start a project, it helps you a lot on vanishing the questions later. If I had a mistake about finishing projects before it was definitely because I didn’t know why I wanted to create them in the first place. All I wanted was to write and publish. I wanted to write for the sake of writing. And that was hurting my spirit more than it should. I was also wasting my time because I didn’t even finished those books. The real waste of time was never writing my reasons and goals before writing those chapters. 

If I can say something for certain, writing the reasons and the goals is not an easy task. You have to have a deep and honest conversation with yourself to actually find these answers. Maybe you’ll think you have the answer because you’ve heard it from someone else, but if you wrote what you heard from others, you’re only hurting yourself. You have to ask yourself what’s the reason for this new project and what goal will achieve in your life before jumping into anything else. And what’s worst, you’ll have to answer with nothing but the truth in your hands.

This first page will be harder to write because we’re not used to be this honest with ourselves, we’re not that connected with our innerself, we’re not used to answer these kind of questions everyday.

So it will be hard, you’ll notice that writing 3 reasons and 2 goals took you an entire day.

But don’t give up, because those 5 sentences are truly the first things you need to write when creating something new.

This post is part of the new series on my blog, the Making-of The Mini-Guide where I share everything I know about writing books! (If you want to read all the past chapters go here).

The Mini-Guide for Writing a Super Complete Post in 20 Minutes was created under the Small Product Lab July 2015 hosted by Gumroad. I’m forever grateful with Gumroad and Small Product Lab for those 10 days.

If you want to read the next chapter of the Making-of The Mini-Guide when is ready, join here: http://kath.pw